Invent

Sosja Prinsen-008 Sosja Prinsen-016

Sosja Prinsen

Email Sosja

Research

My research project, that is funded with a NWO Research Talent Grant, focuses on short-term and long-term effects of justification on self-regulation in both health and consumer behavior. This research challenges the long-held assumption that rational, reflective decision making produces behaviors that are in line with long term goals, whereas emotional and impulsive decisions go hand in hand with self-regulation failure. That is, people may deliberately set aside their long-term goals, especially when they have a justification to do so. This research expands on previous research on self-licensing as it specifically examines the long-term effects of justification on indulgent behaviors like (over)eating and excessive buying. In my studies, I use different methods, including vignettes, lab experiments, and experience sampling.

Teaching

Supervision of Bachelor- and Master theses, teacher in several courses on Bachelor and Master level (e.g., Health Pscyhology, Core Course Clinical and Health Psychology).

Education

In 2009 I earned my master’s degree in Clinical and Health Psychology at Utrecht University. In 2010 I started with the research master Social and Health Psychology. After graduating in 2012, I worked as a research assistant at the University of Amsterdam.  Currently, I am a PhD student at the Social, Health & Organizational Psychology department (SHOP) of Utrecht University.

Selection of Publications

Adriaanse, M.A.*, Prinsen, S.*, De Witt Huberts, J.C., De Ridder, D.T.D., & Evers, C. (2016). ‘I ate too much so I must have been sad’: Emotions as a confabulated reason for overeating. Appetite, 103, 318-323. (* First authors) pdf

Prinsen, S., Evers, C., & De Ridder, D.T.D. (2016). Oops I did it again: Examining self-licensing effects in a subsequent self-regulation dilemma. Applied Psychology: Health and Well-Being, 8, 104-126. pdf

Prinsen, S., De Ridder, D.T.D., & De Vet, E. (2013). Eating by example: Effects of environmental cues on dietary decisions. Appetite, 70,  1-5. pdf

Complete overview of publications

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